As we enter a third la Nina season, many organic operators and farming communities have been heavily impacted by the recent flooding and extreme weather conditions along the East coast. On behalf of AOL, our thoughts go out to all affected farmers and operators. A range of state and federal assistance and resources are now available for affected primary producers, businesses and individuals. These include grants and financial support, disaster recovery resources and mental health services.
Liquor lovers searching for a locally produced and certified organic rum can visit Queensland's Nil Desperandum on the Sunshine Coast, a short walk from the iconic Big Pineapple. Nil Desperandum (Latin for 'Nothing to Despair') launched their first dark rum in February 2022 and promoted it as the first Australian certified organic molasses rum.
AUSTRALIA’S finest organic operators will battle it out for top honours at this year’s Australian Organic Industry Awards, with finalists announced across eight categories. The premier night for the nation’s $2 billion organic industry features two new categories, Brand of the Year and the Innovation Award, in recognition of the trailblazing efforts of those introducing the benefits of organics to new audiences.
This Saturday 15 October is International Day of Rural Women, a welcome opportunity to recognise and celebrate the women progressing organic agriculture in Australia. One such leader is Central Queensland beef cattle producer Melinee Leather, who operates Leather Cattle Company alongside her family and is a committed advocate for long-term sustainability in agriculture.
A media release published today by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission notes there has been a recent spike in agricultural sector scams, with Australian farm businesses losing more than $1.2 million between 1 January and 31 August this year. This is an increase of more than 20 per cent compared to the same period last year, with scams around the sale of tractors and heavy machinery accounting for more than $1 million in losses alone.
Research released last week showing 8% of Australian people in a test population had traces of weed killer glyphosate in their urine has further brought to light the need for consumers to be aware of chemical use in the food supply chain. The research, conducted by the University of Queensland, comes after earlier reports in the media highlighting a number of concerns surrounding the limited understanding of the amount of chemicals on produce.
The story of Organica Australia began in 1977, when Robert Jack and his family were tending to their flower nursery in Chambers Flat, Queensland. The family had slowly replaced the use of chemicals with their own natural formulations and had seen great results using readily available and ecologically sustainable blends.
The increasing availability of organic products and the desire for more healthy living is driving greater demand for organic products according to a new survey of shoppers, with almost six in 10 people purchasing at least one organic product in the past year. AOL CEO Niki Ford, said while certified organic products often cost more because of the way they were produced, there are also a number that may be comparable or even less, and many ways to affordably integrate organic into a household’s weekly shop.
The spread of Lumpy skin disease (LSD) and Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) overseas is a cause for concern among Australian livestock producers. Any incursions could significantly impact our domestic and export industries, so it is vital that sound prevention strategies are adhered to and all stakeholders remain up-to-date on recent news. The following is an update on recent developments, economic risks and current vaccine plans for both diseases, with implications for organic producers explored.